About avian101

My name is H.J. Ruiz, Photography has been my passion since I can remember. This blog is a non-profit way to contribute a bit of knowledge about birds of the world. Photographs are my Copyright. Please do not download any photos without my written permission. Your comments are welcome.

What’s Up?…

Day after Irma…


The day after a downgraded hurricane Irma passed our town, we had a full day of rain before it arrived after midnight on Tuesday which continued for half of next day. That morning, first thing I did was to go outside and make an assessment of the conditions of my house and the surrounding areas, Fortunately, all seemed to be in good order, we did not lose electric power, communications nor Internet. The creek that runs along my backyard was a bit overflowing but nothing to be worried about.

My next assessment was about my birds, feeders, houses etc. Even when was still raining I immediately filled the saucer-feeders (some broken) with fresh seeds also refilled the nectar bottle for the hummingbirds.

Not very long after I was stunned by all the birds that started to come out of the trees, looking for a meal. They were starving! Poor little things.

I even had four hummingbirds that have had a feast and are giving me a show with their game playing.

I prepared my camera and shot away! Today I will show some of the photos from that day. Excuse their appearance, remember that they were under so much physical stress.


Photo Gallery


© HJ Ruiz – Avian101

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My Visitor: Brown Thrasher

Brown Thrasher


The Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum) is a bird in the family Mimidae, which also includes the New World catbirds and mockingbirds. The dispersal of the brown thrasher is abundant throughout the eastern and central United States, southern and central Canada, and is the only thrasher to live primarily east of the Rockies and central Texas. It is the state bird of Georgia.

As a member of the genus Toxostoma, the bird is a large-sized thrasher. It has brown upper parts with a white under part with dark streaks. Because of this, it is often confused with the smaller wood thrush (Hylocichla mustelina), among other species. The brown thrasher is noted for having over 1000 song types, and the largest song repertoire of birds. However, each note is usually repeated in two or three phrases.

The brown thrasher is an omnivore, with its diet ranging from insects to fruits and nuts. The usual nesting areas are shrubs, small trees, or at times on ground level. Brown thrashers are generally inconspicuous but territorial birds, especially when defending their nests, and will attack species as large as humans


Photo Gallery


© HJ Ruiz – Avian101