Photography of Birds – Set # 251

Set # 251


American White Ibis


American White Ibis

American White Ibis


Like other species of ibis, the American White Ibis flies with neck and legs outstretched, often in long loose lines or V formations—a 1986 field study in North Carolina noted over 80% of adult ibis doing so, while juveniles rapidly took up the practice over the course of the summer. The resulting improvement in aerodynamics may lower energy expenditure. These lines fly in an undulating pattern as they alternately flap and glide. Soaring in a circular pattern is also seen. Heights of 500 to 1,000 m (1,600 to 3,300 ft) may be reached as birds glide over flights of 20 km (12 mi) or more. More commonly, birds fly between 60 and 100 m (200 and 330 ft) above the ground, gliding or flapping at a rate of around 3.3 wingbeats a second.

Little Blue Heron


Little Blue Heron

Little Blue Heron


The Little Blue Herons prefer freshwater swamps and lagoons in the South, while on islands in the North they inhabit coastal thickets.They breed in sub-tropical and tropical swamps with mangrove vegetation, wetlands (bogs, fens, peatlands, etc.) and marine intertidal salt marshes.
The little blue heron nests in colonies, often with other herons, usually on platforms of sticks in trees or shrubs. Three to seven light blue eggs are laid. The little blue heron stalks its prey methodically in shallow water, often running as it does so. It eats fish, frogs, crustaceans, small rodents and insects. It eats more insects than the larger herons. Adults usually forage alone, while immatures usually feed in groups.

© HJ Ruiz – Avian101

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