Photography of Birds – Set # 197

Set # 197


Yellow-rumped Warbler


Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler


The Yellow-rumped Warbler (Setophaga coronata) is a regular North American bird species that can be commonly observed all across the continent. Its extensive distribution range connects both the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of the U.S. as well as Canada and Central America, with the population concentrating in the continent’s northern parts during the breeding season and migrating southwards to southern North and Central America in Winter. The species generally prefers coniferous forests or mixed coniferous-deciduous forests as its breeding habitat, while during the winter it can be found inhibiting more open areas such as shrublands that offer food resources. The diet of the Yellow-rumped Warbler is based primarily on insects, though the species does eat fruits like juniper berries as well, especially in winter.

Pine Warbler


Pine Warbler

Pine Warbler


Their breeding habitats are open pine woods in eastern North America. These birds are permanent residents in southern Florida. Some of them, however, migrate to northeastern Mexico and islands in the Caribbean. The first record for South America was a vagrant wintering female seen at Vista Nieve, Colombia, on 20 November 2002; this bird was foraging as part of a mixed-species feeding flock that also included wintering Blackburnian and Tennessee warblers.

Β© HJ Ruiz – Avian101

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