Photography of Birds – Set # 169

Set # 169


Northern Mockingbird


Northern Mockingbird

Northern Mockingbird


The Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) is the only mockingbird commonly found in North America. This bird is mainly a permanent resident, but northern birds may move south during harsh weather. This species has rarely been observed in Europe. This species was first described by Carl Linnaeus in his 1758 10th edition of Systema Naturae as Turdus polyglottos. The northern mockingbird is known for its mimicking ability, as reflected by the meaning of its scientific name, “many-tongued thrush”. The northern mockingbird has gray to brown upper feathers and a paler belly. Its tail and wings have white patches which are visible in flight.

Eastern Towhee (M)


Eastern Towhee (M)

Eastern Towhee (M)


The Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) is a large New World sparrow. The taxonomy of the towhees has been under debate in recent decades, and formerly this bird and the spotted towhee were considered a single species, the rufous-sided towhee.
Their breeding habitat is brushy areas across eastern North America. They nest either low in bushes or on the ground under shrubs. Northern birds migrate to the southern United States. There has been one record of this species as a vagrant to western Europe: a single bird in Great Britain in 1966.

© HJ Ruiz – Avian101

6 thoughts on “Photography of Birds – Set # 169

  1. Two delightful North American species, and both so handsome. I always love the northern mockingbirds for their incredible vocal talents. And found it interesting that an eastern towhee was once spotted in Europe in 1966 – apparently a go-getter. Nice post, HJ.

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