Photography of Birds – Set # 88

Set # 88


House Finch (Family)


House Finch (Family)

House Finch (Family)


Before flying, the young often climb into adjacent plants, and usually fledge at about 11 to 19 days after hatching. Dandelion seeds are among the preferred seeds fed to the young. Contrary to the way most birds, even ones with herbivorous leanings as adults, tend to feed their nestlings animal matter in order to give them the protein necessary to grow, house finches are one of the few birds who feed their young only plant matter.

European Starling  (Family)


European Starling (Family)

European Starling (Family)


Nestlings remain in the nest for three weeks, where they are fed continuously by both parents. Fledglings continue to be fed by their parents for another one or two weeks. A pair can raise up to three broods per year, frequently reusing and relining the same nest, although two broods is typical, or just one north of 48°N. Within two months, most juveniles will have molted and gained their first basic plumage. They acquire their adult plumage the following year. As with other passerines, the nest is kept clean and the chicks’ fecal sacs are removed by the adults.

© HJ Ruiz – Avian101

8 thoughts on “Photography of Birds – Set # 88

  1. I’m so glad I saw this!!!! I hope you can help me, are the little feathers on the tops of their heads, called “spikes”, what is their purpose? How long do they stay upright? I have some images of the young ones that visited here that I intend to post, I’ve enjoyed them so much!

    • Those are pin feathers that will eventually become regular head feather. All it takes is a few days and you won’t see them again. Thank you very much. Z. 🙂

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