Bird’s ID – American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch


The American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) is a small North American bird in the finch family. It is migratory, ranging from mid-Alberta to North Carolina during the breeding season, and from just south of the Canadaโ€“United States border to Mexico during the winter.

The American goldfinch undergoes a molt in the spring and autumn. It is the only cardueline finch to undergo a molt twice a year. During the winter molt it sheds all its feathers; in the spring, it sheds all but the wing and tail feathers, which are dark brown in the female and black in the male. The markings on these feathers remain through each molt, with bars on the wings and white under and at the edges of the short, notched tail. The sexual dimorphism displayed in plumage coloration is especially pronounced after the spring molt, when the bright color of the male’s summer plumage is needed to attract a mate.


Photo Gallery


Can you ID me?



ยฉ HJ Ruiz – Avian101

 

29 thoughts on “Bird’s ID – American Goldfinch

  1. American goldfinches are such a bright and happy joy to come upon. Great photos, HJ, nice to get both genders in the one shot, and the male in the pine needles photo is exquisite.

    • Thanks so much my friend, I like the goldfinches and I always wonder if being so bright and visual will make them more vulnerable to predators. There must be a good reason for that. What do you think? ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Thank you dear Susan! You are exonerated from the butterfly, I don’t know if you have that species in UK. ๐Ÿ™‚

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