V.I.B. Gallery – Field Sparrow

V.I.B. (VERY IMPORTANT BIRDS) GALLERY



© HJ Ruiz – Avian101

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Inca Tern

Inca Tern


The Inca Tern (Larosterna inca) is a tern in the family Laridae. It is the only member of the genus Larosterna.

This uniquely plumaged bird breeds on the coasts of Peru and Chile, and is restricted to the Humboldt Current. It is an erratic, rare visitor to the southwest coast of Ecuador. It can be identified by its dark grey body, white moustache on both sides of its head, and red-orange beak and feet.

The Inca tern is a large tern, approximately 40 cm (16 in) long. Sexes are similar; the adult is mostly slate-grey with white restricted to the facial plumes and the trailing edges of the wings. The large bill and legs are dark red. Immature birds are purple-brown, and gradually develop the facial plumes.


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© HJ Ruiz – Avian101

What’s Up? – Raining on my seeds…

Raining on my seeds…


We have been getting copious amounts of rain lately, right after the cold days subsided. It has been raining  every day from morning to night. We hardly see the blue sky, it’s gray and dark instead.

I know for what I’m able to see, that my birds are having a hard time to feed when it’s raining. Once in a while, the rain stops and most of the birds desperately come out trying to find any dry seeds. They can be seen waiting in sight in the surrounding areas of the deck.That’s my cue: It is the time  I go out and dump all the soggy seeds and refill with fresh dry ones. As soon as this is done, Birds get excited for getting their meals!

The Mourning Doves are more in quantity and kind of mob the feeders, that’s when my “Sheriff”  (Northern Mockingbird) comes along and chases every body out! He eats some peanuts and then leaves. I have the feeling that he means to protect his territory but not to harm anyone.

Of course, five minutes later would start raining again!


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© HJ Ruiz – Avian101